Creation Of Adam

Sculpture derived from the arms of Adam/God from The Creation of Adam, in Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling.

Creation of Adam
2000. Plastecine Clay.
 
This was created for a CEO of Delta Airlines to fit his office bookshelf with the same Marble Resin production company I had created the Modonna. This time I would only work for cash up front. On cutting the check they dropped the negotiated amount by 1/4, so I told them that this would limit the abstraction I had offered.  I made a deal with myself for my hourly rate that I would not work beyond, and set about seeing how much I could accomplish in the 10 hours of my time they had purchased. Not enough to engage the abstract elements, but enough to please the patron. The 1/4 they dropped off was also their lack of respect for what I was bringing to the table, so I dropped the abstraction as that would have moved it into the realm of what I would consider my own creative work, rather than the academic exercise it was.
This sort of production was somehow a lower rung on the art ladder than my years working in a bronze-arts foundry in Loveland, Colorado. Loveland calls itself the "Venice of The West" boasting the most artists per capita in America. A few of us artist-per-capita drone technicians had majored in sculpture at Colorado State University, one town further up the Front Range. Loveland bronze production was the proverbial Thunder Dome for creatives, but instead of "two men enter, one man leave" it was "one artist enter, his art dies here". Most artists worked there for the low-cost casting, but became too beat down to make thier own work after a few years, and soon couldn't muster themselves to leave and gave themselves up to the factory. Those who worked happily there often had no background in fine arts, but were proficient with welders and grinders. In the foundry I was doing metal and wax work in the production of multiples from an original, an original made in clay by a singular artist. In this new reality Beyond the Thuder Dome I was making the original in clay with less self-respect than I had in the production of bronze editions. Some artists think they can do this kind of distopian work with no damage, but it just isn't true.  
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